happy new year horse listening

 

In celebration of the New Year, and to thank you for your readership, we are giving away 5 copies of the digital version of our newest book, Five Years Of Horse Listening! It's our fifth year anniversary for the blog, and what a better way to celebrate into the first day of 2017!

All you have to do is write the name of your favorite Horse Listening article in the comments below. One entry per person. If you need to remember a title, go to the search bar on any blog page, search for the topic to find the (correct!) title of your favorite post, and copy and paste the title in the comment section below.

The giveaway is open to current readers as well as new readers (so tell your friends!). Entries will be accepted starting now and ending at midnight (12:00 am) on Jan.2. The randomly chosen winners will be announced on the morning of January 3rd. 

Good luck, and Happy Holidays!

 

127 Comments

  1. Love the laterals – An explanation.
    Simple, clear, accurate, and there is a picture for every figure. This article really helps me to “figure it out” 😉 Happy 2017 to you and your horses! Thanks for everything!
    Marie-Joelle & Cortado🐎

  2. Excellent article – “Improve trot to canter transition”. Transitions is sooooo very important when training a horse. I could write a book just on the importance of transitions. Bill Finlay – RCMP Musical Ride instructor, Retired.

  3. So many to choose from, I learn something from every article. “10 tips for the average rider” is a favorite of mine.

  4. It is too difficult to choose between your different transition blogs…Pick any of them, they are all very helpful!

  5. My favorite article has to be “Ride the Walk: Pedaling”. I have learned how integral the Walk can be in keeping all other gaits relaxed, the ribs and spine swinging and for the horse to have a normal, healthy, unrestricted breathing pattern. I had a house with a strange line over last ribs that I later found out was due to his holding his breath. He HIGHLY benefited from this very exercise, and it transferred to ALL the other gaits. As long as the ribs and spine were moving in a relaxed fashion, his breathing would be relaxed and the ride was beautiful. Whenever he tightened up, we returned to the pedaling walk to regain that relaxation and then carry on to trot and canter work. I want to say that with this particular very sensitive horse, it was “The” exercise that “made” him his very BEST.
    Love this conformation of what I felt I needed to do with my guy!!! Thank you!!!

  6. So many are posts are great, emphasizing quietness and patience! For my own position, I particularly liked “Here’s How (and Why) You Should Ride with Bent Elbows”. Thank you for your insight and the comments of others on this topic. Happy New Year!

  7. This one has helped me a lot. Have read it many times. How The “Not Canter” Can Drastically Improve Your Transitions

  8. Only one??? Can’t tell you how many I have saved…but my favorite, this is difficult. However the one I reread just this week was unleashing the power of the seat! A reminder of my ultimate goal and so appropriate for the new year! If I had the book would I still download and take to the barn? Probably!

  9. There are so many useful articles, but Why You Don’t Need to Panic When Your Horse “Falls Apart” During Your Ride has really applied to my riding recently. The horse I lease gets unbalanced cantering on the right lead, especially when she’s fresh or stiff (hello Wintertime!) so this was helpful advice.

    1. going forward off your legs…..meaning the horse is going forward energetically while using your back, seat and legs to push him on…..follow the movement of the horse with your legs….when his near hind is coming up push with your left leg. This will force him to step up and underneath of himself…..opposite aids on off side….

  10. The Pinnacle of Horseback Riding.
    I love this article, it helps give me the imprint in my mind for a physical feeling to achieve. That relaxed muscle strength.

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